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1. An effective teacher/instructor with skills in:
(a) Using, evaluating, and adapting instructional materials

1a1 Instructional materials and data warehousing

Development Plan
Apply this to training and communication aspects of implementing a Data Warehouse at Andrews University.

Introduction
1.1 Andrews University Presentations
      1.1.1 Data Warehousing
      1.1.2 Prioritizing Strategic Technologies
      1.1.3 IT Management Course
      1.1.4 MIS (Management Information Systems) Course
      1.1.5 PowerPoint animation effects at Sanitarium
1.2 Videotape and PowerPoint Presentations On Data Warehousing
     

Introduction

Competency 1(a) was a bit of a struggle for me initially, largely because I had a mind set that associated this competency with classroom teaching.  I had heard our professors telling us that we should write our IDPs around our particular work situations, but although I wrote mine that way, I was not fully convinced that it was legitimate.  I think this was partly due to the fact that the reading list had such a predominance of books on the classroom, on curriculum development, on dealing with discipline problems in schools, etc.

To demonstrate my competence as "An effective teacher/instructor with skills in using, evaluating, and adapting instructional materials", the Development Plan that I wrote into my IDP was to "Apply this to training and communication aspects of implementing a Data Warehouse at Andrews University."  I have actually decided to include additional examples outside this specific area, in particular, some course materials I developed for classes I taught as an adjunct professor at Andrews, and some PowerPoint slides I prepared for a presentation to the Executive Management Group at Sanitarium Health Food Company.

1.1 Andrews University Presentations

Portfolio Documentation

1. Instructional materials and data warehousing:

1.1 Describe Data Warehousing presentations to Cabinet, Deans' Council, Strategic Planning Committee, general and departmental chairs and faculty meetings, computing and other committees. Include a theoretical rationale for the way instructional strategies were used in selecting and adapting presentation materials and styles.

1.1.1 Data Warehousing

When I arrived at Andrews University in mid-1996, the institution was more than half way through implementing a commercial Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system called Banner, replacing a system that had been developed in-house.  The commercial package may have had a rich feature set, but it provided only the most basic reports, and this lack of decision support information was sorely by users who had been used to having their needs met internally.

Because of my studies in data warehousing, I knew that the best long term solution to the lack of adequate reporting in Banner was to build a data warehouse specially for data reporting and analysis.  My task was to show people in key positions what could be accomplished with data warehousing, then with the support of those people, obtain approval to invest in the resources needed to build a data warehouse.  Words such as "training", "teaching", and "instructing" were simply the wrong words to use in this setting.  It was much more a matter of "raising awareness" and "influencing".

One approach I used to get the process started was to invite key players from across the university to join a Data Warehouse Steering Committee.  The agenda from our inaugural meeting in November, 1998, includes a list of those invited to join the committee.  (See index of minutes from preliminary meetings and the meetings of the Data Warehouse Steering Committee.)

I used a combination of printed handouts and PowerPoint slides in a variety of venues.  In addition to the opportunities presented in the meetings of the Steering Committee, I gave talks about data warehousing in the President's Cabinet, the Deans' Council, the Strategic Planning Committee, the Academic and Administrative Computing Committees, the General Faculty Meeting, and in some departmental meetings.  Along with the presentation (usually via PowerPoint with handouts), I often demonstrated the interactive data analysis made possible with data warehousing using a tool called PowerPlay from Cognos.  The reaction to these presentations was invariably very positive, and "when can we have it."  In fact, the pressure to deliver on the promises of easier reporting and analysis became embarrassing, because, in the short term, it way outstripped our capacity to allocate resources to the project.

Here are some of the "instructional" materials I prepared for the various meetings and committees:

1.1.2 Prioritizing Strategic Technologies

The data warehousing project was one of fifteen Strategic Information Technologies that were identified by late 1999, and I estimated that we had the resources to tackle about five of them in a single 12-month period.  So we used a voting method to get input from key groups on campus about which projects were the most strategically important.  The groups I presented to were the Academic and Administrative Computing Committees, the President's Cabinet, the Deans' Council, the Strategic Planning Committee, and the ITS management group.  When the votes were counted, data warehousing tied for first place in getting the most votes for projects of strategic importance to Andrews University.

However, it was not until 2001 that the first pilot datamart was built.  The combination of Y2K and the Web Registration initiative consumed all available resources until then.

1.1.3 IT Management Course

In 1998, the School of Business Administration at Andrews University asked me to teach a course in IT Management to their Master of Science in Computer Science students in Singapore.  I had to create the course from scratch, including selecting textbooks, preparing all instructional material, setting assignments and working out grading policies.  The textbook I chose was a business book for practitioners rather than a textbook for students, and while it was a very good book for the course, it did not include any teaching aids, so I had to create the course outline, the teaching slides, the quizzes and exams, and the assignments.

I compiled a page of web links as a reading resource on the subject of IT Management and in September, 2003, I was approached by a representative from Ovitz Taylor Gates about my IT Management reading list.  They had placed a link to my page on their site, believing it would be of interest to their 4000-5000 daily visitors.  I was flattered that my page was considered to be of value to them, especially since I have not updated it since November 1998, almost 5 years earlier.

1.1.4 MIS (Management Information Systems) Course

Another course I taught for the School of Business is MIS (Management Information Systems).  The textbook I used for this course came with instructor's guides, PowerPoint slides, and a database of quizzes on each chapter.  I still prepared my own course outline and assignments, but I developed technology for importing the quizzes into WebCT so that the students could take the quizzes out of class time (I taught the course as a two week intensive so this optimized in-class time for lecturing and discussion).

I prepared a mock up of the WebCT home page as part of my portfolio documentation for Competency 6(e).  WebCT proved to be very popular with the students for taking the quizzes.  There was one quiz per chapter, and I allowed them up to 5 attempts at each quiz, taking their highest score for grading purposes.  It was open-book, done in their own time, and extended the learning experience significantly.  Because I did not set a time limit on the quizzes, the students had time to research answers they we not positive about, so they came to know their textbook and the material in it very well.  I downloaded the Quiz Progress Summaries and the Quiz Scores from WebCT for the 1999 course I taught in Singapore.

I also used WebCT to continue class discussion beyond the two weeks of the course.  I chose a topical online article, and set discussion questions that the class debated on the WebCT Bulletin Board over the three weeks following the end of the course.  WebCT's Student Tracking screen provided a ready summary of the number of reads and postings for each student.

The use of WebCT definitely enhanced the learning experience of the students taking this course as an intensive.

1.1.5 PowerPoint animation effects at Sanitarium

When I transferred to Sanitarium Health Food Company at the end of 2002, I found an IT organization that was functioning effectively, but I also saw that pressure from user areas was building and was threatening to overwhelm the IT department.  At the same time, I noticed in my work-related reading that a lot of attention was being given to the need to reduce complexity in IT in order to manage costs.  The way to reduce complexity was to eliminate disparate systems and move towards a single integrated architecture for the whole enterprise.

The timing was right to apply some of this philosophy at Sanitarium.  A number of business units were in the process of evaluating IT solutions outside the SAP enterprise software package Sanitarium had invested in, and these solutions would only increase complexity, not reduce it.

In June, 2003, I presented "An IT Strategy for Sanitarium" to the IT Steering Committee.  I went to some effort to prepare a PowerPoint presentation that used animation to reinforce the points I was making (see slides 5 to 8, especially 7 and 8).  The point I was making in the slides was that we need a seamless information chain, with end-to-end transparency, to support the Sanitarium Value Chain, a concept of crucial importance in the minds of the Sanitarium executives.  With the aid of the PowerPoint animation, the point was powerfully made, and the two motions I was making (adoption of an Enterprise Architecture statement and an official IT Project Approval Process) were enthusiastically endorsed.  Each of the General Managers announced these two actions of the IT Steering Committee in a memo to their staff.

1.2 Videotape and PowerPoint Presentations On Data Warehousing

Portfolio Documentation

1. Instructional materials and data warehousing:

1.2 Include videotaped PowerPoint presentation on data warehousing prepared during Master of Computing.

When I moved to Andrews University as Director of the AU Computing Center in 1996, I was in the final stages of a Master of Computing.  This created a difficult situation regarding my thesis, which was on data warehousing at Avondale College, where I no longer worked.  Actually, that turned out not to be a major problem, but i still had to find ways to collaborate with my professor at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, and to present my thesis.

I was using Microsoft Word on a PC to write the thesis, and my professor also used Microsoft Word, only he had it on a Macintosh, and all the diagrams I labored over came out wrong on the Mac.  So this became the first major project I published via the web, since there is much better device independence via the web.  I used the web to post the pdf version of my thesis, but I also converted the whole document to HTML, breaking it into chapters for faster downloading, and adding hyperlinks to connect the various parts and to make the cross references easier to follow.  This proved to be a very effective way to communicate what I was learning and what I was attempting to show about data warehousing.

In addition to writing the thesis, I had to give a presentation on my findings, and to assist with this, I used PowerPoint to create some visual aids, and prepared a handout using Word in which I included additional notes about the material I was presenting.  But that still left the problem of how to actually make the presentation, since I was now living on the other side of the planet.

My professor asked if I was able to videotape my presentation and send that over, and that was an option I was glad to take advantage of.  Andrews University had a studio set up specifically for videotaping instructional material, so I made arrangements to record my presentation there.  I very carefully prepared a script for the camera operator, so they would know when I was going to advance the presentation to the next bullet or the next slide.  I also used PowerPoint's rehearsal feature to record the approximate time I would spend on each slide.  I published the script on the data warehousing web site, both in HTML and as a Word Document (in pdf).

The first time I recorded the presentation, the sound did not record, so I had to do it again.  I expected to be more at ease doing it the second time, but for some reason, I felt the second taping did not flow as well, and was a little more formal and less spontaneous.  However, I had a copy of the second taping made in the PAL format used in Australia, and shipped it off to my professor.  He regarded it so highly that he asked my permission to place it in the library to make it available for wider viewing.  I have digitized the video, but the file is too large to place on my web site.  I have a link to the location on my local hard drive so I can demonstrate it, but it is not available for download.  However, I also created a 15 second clip, as a sample, and that is small enough to view from my web site.

This project illustrates the use of a variety of presentation media. 

Links to Data Warehousing at Avondale College - Master of Computing Thesis

 
The project web site ACDW.html - created in 1996
The report itself ACDWTOC.html DWReport.pdf (597KB) DWReport.zip (169KB)
PowerPoint slides   DWPresPP.ppt (300KB) DWPresPP.zip (240KB)
Presentation Handout   DWPresHO.pdf (903KB) DWPresHO.zip (721KB)
Presentation Script DWPresSc.htm DWPresSc.pdf (514KB) DWPresSc.zip (159KB)
Full Video
Snipet
 

DWPres.wmv (334MB)
15 second clip (306KB)

 

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Created: Sunday, February 20, 2000 04:22 PM
Last Modified: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 9:11 AM