THE ANDREWS EXPERIENCE:

 

ANDREWS UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGIC
PLAN 2001-2006


 

CONTENTS

 

 

The Mission of Andrews University

Preamble: A Vision For Andrews University

I.

Effectively Managing the Enrollment Process At Andrews University

II.

Undergraduate Student Success Leading To Better Retention

III.

Undergraduate Student Life and Learning On Campus

IV.

Celebrating a Diverse, Multicultural University Community

V.

Spiritual and Moral Formation

VI.

Faculty Development and the Academic Success Of Students

VII.

Graduate Education

VIII.

International Education Leadership

IX.

Distance Education and the Off-Campus Student

X.

Providing An Academic Learning Community For Undergraduates

XI.

Financial Resources and Student Financial Support

XII.

The Public Profile Of Andrews University

 

The Mission of Andrews University

 

Andrews University educates its students for generous service to the church and society in keeping with a faithful witness to Christ and to the worldwide mission of the Seventh-day Adventist church.

 

Accordingly, students are challenged:

 

v     to be inquisitive

v     to think clearly and communicate effectively

v     to explore the arts, letters and sciences within the context of a Christian point of view

v     to develop competencies in their chosen fields of study

v     to prepare for a meaningful position in the work place

v     to respect ethnic and cultural diversity

v     to embrace a wholesome way of life

v     to heed God’s call to personal and moral integrity

v     to nurture life in the Spirit, and

v     to affirm their faith commitment

 

-- from Andrews University Bulletin p.8

Preamble: A Vision For Andrews University

 

This strategic plan looks squarely at the single most important part of the university, namely, the Andrews student. Several factors prompted this focus: First, general agreement exists that student success in college warrants the ongoing attention of every educational institution including Andrews. Second, our historic commitment to the holistic education that transforms college students into knowledgeable, responsible and compassionate individuals has received new urgency at this time. Third, the Christian values and spiritual aspirations associated with an Andrews education must be shared with students in an overt and intentional way. Finally, it is our conviction that student success in these areas inevitably leads to institutional success.

 

Therefore, this strategic plan calls for Andrews University to forge an educational experience–an Andrews experience–whereby all members of a diverse student body are exposed to knowledge and its meaning, to responsibility and its undergirding values, and to eternal questions about themselves and their Creator. This exposure occurs in the intense but pleasant company of exemplary, caring mentors and teachers, and the goal is nothing less than a life-changing experience for every Andrews student in keeping with the highest ideals of the Seventh-day Adventist philosophy of education.

 

In order to achieve this goal, the university will take the steps necessary to identify talented and industrious students who cherish the benefits of a good Christian education; to induct them into Andrews with ease and elegance and in sufficient numbers to increase the critical mass of our various student groups; to support them adequately with financial aid; and to teach them capably and in harmony with our Christian mission. The institutional resources devoted to this objective include faculty development, administrative and staff support, and campus facilities.

 

Behind this strategic plan lie the intentions of making Andrews University a distinctive Seventh-day Adventist University among Christian universities in the nation; a model institution for comprehensive Adventist tertiary institutions in the world; and the educational institution of choice for able and committed students, faculty, staff and administrators.

 

Niels-Erik Andreasen,
President of Andrews University
Summer, 2001

 

The intention is to make Andrews University a distinctive Seventh-day Adventist university among Christian universities--the institution of choice for able and committed students, faculty, staff, and administration.


I.                   Effectively Managing the Enrollment Process At Andrews University

A. Definition And Vision

The Enrollment Management department will identify Seventh-day Adventist and other Christian students who value the goals of Andrews University and will connect them with the university and its resources.

 

Towards this end, the staff of the department will work consistently to facilitate seamless and barrier-free interaction (AS) between the university and the student who desires to attend.

 

This will be accomplished by modeling superior and proactive customer service (AS: CRM, Portal) to students, their families, the thought leaders, schools, churches and other institutions and communities that are a part of their lives.

 

Additionally, Enrollment Management will develop processes (AS) that directly focus on and meet the needs of individual students. These processes will be designed to assure consistent measurement and accountability.

 

Enrollment Management will play a leading role in identifying distinctive niches and market positions (IR) for Andrews University; in developing, inspiring and managing an effective enrollment team; and in relying on effective marketing, recruitment and enrollment practices to target and attract appropriate market segments, hereby bringing the university’s enrollment to desired levels.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Identify (IR), refine, articulate and affirm the distinctive niche and market positions for Andrews University.

2.      Develop a well-trained enrollment management team, effective and measurable processes (AS) and effective collaboration (AS; CS) with other key departments on campus.

3.      Develop, implement and champion a customer service-oriented seamless system for prospective students from inquiry to application to successful admission, enrollment and retention. (AS: CRM, Portal)

4.      Develop strategic marketing materials and approaches that effectively and selectively target prospective students within defined market segments.

5.      When appropriate, extend Andrews University’s recruiting and retention reach and effectiveness by relying on alumni, parents, church employees, university faculty, staff and students and others as key players in those processes.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Distinctive Niches and Market Positions

a.      Gather together key players in a “positioning” summit to affirm distinctive niches and market positions of Andrews University (academic strength, global, diverse).

b.     Conduct demographic, historical, cultural and related research to assess perceptions/images of Andrews University in the minds of its students (including those who did not attend, or who attended and then left), faculty, staff and stakeholders. (IR)

c.      Use research from Noel-Levitz marketing communication analysis (including its surveys of prospective students and analysis of competitors’ materials). (AS; IR)

d.      Differentiate between felt and actual needs.

e.      Define market segments that will meet and enhance the distinctive niches and market positions identified.

f.       Target and attract those market segments (using such approaches as magnet programs, early high school recruiting and collaboration with feeder schools and their faculty).

2.      Process, Collaboration and Human Resources

a.      Define best-performance measures for key processes and identify process “champions” within the office to assure motivation and success.

b.     Commit to ongoing training and development of all staff.

c.      Clearly define policies and procedures within the office.

d.      Create, communicate and monitor a clear office structure and job descriptions.

e.      Define and pursue points of collaboration (AS; CS) with campus functions and departments that contribute to enrollment management while not being a formal part of the Enrollment Management team.

f.      Grow academic departmental partnership with enrollment initiatives

i.      Developmental advising by faculty.

ii.     Timely departmental responses to prospective student inquiries and enrollment referrals. (AS)

iii.     Participation in College Days and visitation weekends.

iv.    Participation in academy and enrollment fairs.

v.      Maintaining attractive departmental home pages. (AS; UR)

3.      Seamless Systems

a.      Identify and analyze successful systems at other institutions (both competitors and otherwise).

b.      Develop a customer-driven process (AS) that remains committed to core standards, policies and procedures of Andrews University.

c.      Maximize the personal touch and “mass customization” as a tool for understanding and answering inquiries and applications (i.e. “My AU” website). (AS)

d.      Simplify the inquiry, application and admission process (including an emphasis on “one-stop shopping”) without compromising the rigor and standards by which we evaluate prospective students. (AS)

4.      Marketing Communication Approaches and Materials

a.      Use Noel-Levitz research as a strategic foundation for new materials and approaches.

b.      Develop a market-specific approach (producing print and non-print materials, advertising and other communications that effectively target various market segments, geographic region, culture, and age).

c.      Identify low-cost ways to provide these materials (i.e. Using Babelfish™ -- an online web-site translation service -- on the Andrews web-site, creating custom CDs for key prospective students, producing customizable brochures that can be adapted in-house for highly focused markets). (AS)

d.      Collaborate with academic departments and related functions on campus to produce marketing materials that communicate the market position and reflect a corporate look. (CS)

5.      Extended Recruiting Staff

a.      Study those who influence prospective students in the process of thinking about higher education and then inquiring and/or applying to Andrews University.  Develop programs that either communicate with these individuals or train them to serve as part of the recruiting process.

b.      Actively expand student-to-student recruiting initiatives, including the use of discipline-specific student mentors for campus tours, College Days and recruiting by phone and mail. Also work closely with touring groups to review itineraries and offer recruiting training and materials as appropriate.

c.      Actively involve key faculty in recruiting efforts, including off-campus visits and on-campus hosting of or communication with prospective students.  Integrate these efforts with the overall strategy and operations of the Enrollment Management department.

d.      Identify and train key alumni (offering a diversity of disciplines and geographic regions) to assist in recruiting students.

e.      Target and actively train other individuals and departments throughout the Andrews University campus to increase their understanding of and effective involvement in the recruiting process.

D. Projected Outcome

Enrollment at Andrews University will increase by 15-20 percent within the next five years, bringing the eventual enrollment to 3500 (2000 undergraduate, 1500 graduate). This increased enrollment will be achieved by consistently and effectively focusing on the successful recruitment and retention of the key market segments.

II. Undergraduate Student Success Leading To Better Retention

A. Definition And Vision

According to Noel Levitz, “Re-enrollment or retention is not the goal; retention is the result or by-product of improved programs and services in our classrooms and elsewhere on the campus that contribute to student success.”  Therefore, this section deals with increasing student success, particularly the success of freshmen.  To do this, we must offer programming that attracts students and then admit those students we can best serve.

 

Andrews’ current retention rate of 45% (that is, the proportion of entering freshmen who will complete a degree within six years), is normative within the Adventist educational system but below national standards.

 

Undergraduate students will be attracted and connected to programs that match their goals and will be supported in obtaining a successful experience.  As a result, the graduation rate will increase.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Define a freshman experience that invites the student to learn, enhances motivation, and integrates the entering student into a caring campus environment.

2.      Provide students with an array of exciting and engaging learning opportunities.  (See also plank on Faculty Development).

3.      Make parents partners with the university in the development and learning success of their son or daughter’s undergraduate experience.

4.      Establish an office of student success to advocate for resolution of student problems and changes that support increased retention.

5.      Support students with special needs through a case management system with comprehensive input.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Define a freshman experience that invites the student to learn, enhances motivation, and integrates the entering student into a caring campus environment.

a.      Attract and admit students whose secondary record shows good potential for success in college.

b.      Identify the courses most frequently taken by freshmen (IR) in the General Education curriculum and match these with effective instructors, thus optimizing the positive nature of the first learning encounters.

c.      Develop departmental and other programs that bring people together and create community.

d.      Identify ways to establish and sustain key relationships between freshmen, more experienced peers, faculty, and staff so that freshmen develop a strong sense of belonging early in their college career. (AS)

2.      Provide students with an array of exciting and engaging learning opportunities.

a.      Offer classroom and related experiences outside the conventional classroom that challenge motivated and successful students to excel.

b.      Provide opportunities for interdisciplinary instruction.

c.      Develop opportunities for students to participate in undergraduate research/creative activities and service projects in teams led by faculty members.

d.      Re-structure and revitalize the Honors Scholars program.

e.      Enrich the college experience through carefully structured international tours to give students the culturally enriching experience of seeing and analyzing other parts of the world.

f.      Encourage faculty to become involved in student development activities as mentors for living and learning (see also plant IV.)

g.      Increase awareness and access of students to the academic support system: tutoring, study skill groups, peer support groups, behavior modification support groups, the Writing Center, the Math Center, and the University Center for Reading and Learning Assessment.

h.      Involve students in departmental and administrative planning and decision-making.

3.      Make parents partners with the university in the development and learning success of their son or daughter’s undergraduate experience.

a.      Begin the process of retention by interacting with parents as they visit the campus with their prospective students.

b.      Develop and implement a summer orientation weekend (PREP Seminar) prior to freshman matriculation to create a communication loop between parents, students, and institutional personnel.

c.      Provide parents with regular feedback on their son or daughter’s academic progress by appropriate updates during the academic term. (AS)

d.      Provide parents with a handbook with helpful information and practical advice on how they can help their son/daughter make a successful transition to college.

4.      Establish an office of student success to advocate for resolution of student problems and changes that support increased retention.

a.      Restructure the Academic Support and Advising Services (ASAS) office into an office of student success that includes a Director of University Retention, an Academic Success consultant, an Advising Services Coordinator, and a Tutoring and Skill Services Coordinator.

b.      Advocate for improved resolution of student problems and systemic changes university-wide that support increased retention.

c.      Conduct regular studies of student success and retention (College Student Inventory, Student Satisfaction surveys, retention data analysis) to guide planning and program improvement. (IR)

d.      Create a developmental advising system by training advisors and enhancing support resources that facilitate faculty in creating a mentorship relationship with students before graduation. (AS: web registration...)

e.      Establish a peer mentor program to assist in building student-student and student-faculty relationships.

f.      Develop and promote a comprehensive system of providing support services and evaluate its effectiveness through CQI processes. (AS; IR)

5.      Support students with special needs through a case management system with comprehensive input. (AS)

a.      Accept a limited number of motivated but academically challenged students to be placed in a structured program with intense supervision and support.

b.      Establish an electronic flagging system to provide efficient intervention with (e.g. financial, social, and/or academic risks) students. (AS)

D. Projected Outcome

Studies of student satisfaction will show an increase in satisfaction indicators, and the six-year graduation rate will have increased to 55%.

III.            Undergraduate Student Life and Learning On Campus

A. Definition And Vision

The development of Christian character encompasses a balanced spiritual, mental, social, and physical lifestyle.  Student Services focuses on the multiple activities and exposures that connect living and learning.

 

Students will have an Andrews Experience that is intentional, compelling, complementary, and filled with possibilities for the active formation of core Christian values.

 

This experience obviously implies substantial resources and funding.

 

The life of a student involves residential living, spiritual facilitation, social and cultural opportunities, mental exercise, mentoring, health and wellness, and physical provisions for comfort and lifestyle development. To assist in student growth, specific core values have been developed by each departmental area directly connected with the mission.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.   To provide students with experiences that connect living and learning within a Christian context.

2.   To provide students with an improved quality of life.

3.   To provide programming that facilitates successful participation in the work place.

4.   To provide students with a diversity of social and cultural opportunities.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      As regards giving students greater social and cultural exposure.

a.      Provide fine arts emphases including plays, dramatic productions, symphonies, Christian artist series and other cultural exposures such as “Points of Interest” excursions. A minimum of three would be major related activities planned for 2001-2002; ultimately there would be eight per year. [This will be a collaborative effort through the Student Activities Department, Schools of the University, International Student Services, University Relations Department, and University Advancement.]

b.     Open an International House from which cultural activities can emanate throughout the school year. (International Student Services)

2.      As regards connecting the living and learning of students.

Build significantly on efforts that have already begun through the programming of the Living Learning Center, Leadership Initiative, and the University Forums. The University Forums, in particular, will provide an opportunity to bring to our campus significant contributors to the nation’s dialogue and development in the areas of politics, economics, science, religion, law, national and international affairs, as well as social and professional matters. Three forums for the ensuing year, 2001-2002, and up to eight in the fifth year would be desirable. [In reality, the living and learning experiences in this goal connect as well to goal number one with respect to the matter of exposure.] (Residence Halls, CARL Committee)

3.      As regards improving the quality of student life.

a.      Focus on keeping students “classroom-ready” both emotionally and mentally. (Counseling and Testing and Health Services)

b.      Emphasize faith and learning integration, a balanced lifestyle, and the concept of community. (Campus Ministries, Intramurals, International Student Services)

c.      Provide for the students’ social and physical development, especially a Gymnatorium where a variety of holistic activities can be delivered, including the possibility of an Andrews brand of intercollegiate sports. [Health Services, Intramurals, Student Activities Department, and AUSA will collaborate in this endeavor.]

d.     Upgrade Lamson Hall to create cluster-style apartment living and provide an appropriate relocation of the health club in Meier Hall, along with more user-friendly furniture in student rooms. [Apartment cluster living would probably begin with housing for 100 students reflecting approximately 24 such cluster apartments in Lamson Hall and increasing to 200 students.] (Residence Halls and Student Services Administration)

4.      As regards facilitating successful participation in the work place.

a.      Specific mentoring support for all students beginning with freshmen  in collaboration with academic success teams.  (Career Planning and Placement with Academic Departments)

b.      More intentional support for the Student Missionary program, including communication with the students when they are away and facilitating re-entry and programming upon their return.  (Campus Ministries, Student Activities)

c.      Tailored advising and cooperative internships to facilitate a successful transition from student life to professional life. [Career Planning and Placement.]

D. Projected Outcome

The above efforts will generate vitality and energy in the life of the university. Living and learning will become a reality that some may not have experienced heretofore. Students will be better prepared for a society in which they are expected to live, work, and contribute. Nurturing life from a Christian point of view will become axiomatic. Completing the expectations of Adventist education in a rounded manner would result. An appreciation of various cultural exposures would be achieved, a worldview would be formulated, and the ability to interact and contribute internationally would be enhanced.

IV.            Celebrating a Diverse, Multicultural University Community

A. Definition And Vision

Andrews University is committed to the biblical and theological principle that God created humans in diverse forms and seeks to save all nations, kindreds, tongues, and peoples.  Therefore, diversity is central to the mission of an institution serving the world church of Seventh-day Adventists.  Diversity encourages inclusiveness and builds relationships, coalitions, and cooperation among the various ethnic, racial, and cultural groups, inclusive of mental/physical abilities.

 

As an international institution with a diverse student population representing more than 100 countries, the Andrews University campus is a microcosm of a global community. That provides an unparalleled opportunity for learning experiences for students, staff, and faculty. At the same time, it raises significant challenges.

 

The Andrews Experience will embody a multicultural environment that optimizes the learning experiences of its students and demonstrates the value of a global and diverse church living in community.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Identify the needs of various students for services and support that assure academic success and completion of their degree goals.

2.      Develop skills, knowledge, and attitudes about inclusiveness and multiculturalism that will enable faculty, staff, and administration to deliver appropriate and effective services to a diverse student population.

3.      Develop an Institute for Diversity and Multiculturalism to undertake research and create programs which educate and promote inclusiveness as a spiritual focus in a multicultural community.

4.      Enrich the learning experiences of each student so that he/she can function successfully in a global and increasingly diverse workplace.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Identify the needs of various students for services and support that assure academic success and completion of their degree goals.

a.      Undertake student satisfaction studies of minority groups and cultures.

b.      Obtain and analyze retention data for factors supporting and impeding completion of degrees.

2.      Develop skills, knowledge, and attitudes about inclusiveness and multiculturalism that will enable faculty, staff, and administration to deliver appropriate and effective services to a diverse student population.

a.      Create a learning community where diversity is valued and validated:

i.       Encourage all students to participate actively and consistently in classroom discussions.

ii.      Proactively build relationships with all students.

iii.     Challenge minority students to do their best without regard to stereotyping.

iv.     Create a classroom climate that is accepting of cultural differences.

v.      Define clear criteria for evaluation that are fair, and consider different learning styles and prior academic backgrounds.

vi.     Integrate multicultural concepts across the curriculum by use of examples, assignments, and respect for multiple intelligences.

b.      Provide training to faculty, staff, and administration on the differences between majority and minority cultures.  Examples might include the roles of language, needs of first-generation students, expectations of faculty, study patterns, and testing styles.

c.      Provide bilingual services in key support offices such as enrollment management, financial services, registrar, academic support.

d.     Create committees of faculty and staff from minority cultures to advise the university on the means for increasing student success and persistence to graduation at Andrews.

3.      Develop an Institute for Diversity and Multiculturalism to undertake research and create programs which educate and promote inclusiveness as a spiritual focus in a multicultural community.

a.      Provide training for the leaders of the worldwide Seventh-day Adventist Church who deal with memberships and responsibilities that are increasingly diverse.

b.      Educate faculty, staff, and administration to appreciate and value the benefits and advantages of diversity in their responsibilities as part of the corporate culture.

c.      Collaborate with university personnel in presenting the advantages of a diverse campus to parents and prospective students.

d.      Offer consultation to corporations, educational institutions, businesses, law enforcement, churches, and health care systems.

4.      Enrich the learning experiences of each student so that he/she can function successfully in a global and increasingly diverse workplace.

a.      Consider developing a course in multiculturalism for all undergraduate students as part of the General Education curriculum.

b.      Encourage greater opportunities for  students to engage in overseas learning experiences.

c.      Expand the orientation and mentoring of minority students who are entering  the mainstream North American culture.

D. Projected Outcome

As a result of our various action steps Andrews Alumni will report increased comfort with and competency in multiculturalism in their workplace, church and community compared to levels reported in the 2000 Alumni Survey.

 

Meanwhile graduation rates among minority students, specifically Hispanic and Afro-American segments, will improve significantly.

V.              Spiritual and Moral Formation

A. Definition And Vision

As the centerpiece of the university’s mission, the spiritual and moral development of our students is worthy of our best intentional efforts.  Faculty and staff can help create such a culture because they have been taught how to nurture students and because they themselves work in a supportive and caring campus community.  Students will respond by making positive choices and by becoming increasingly self-directed in their own learning and development.

 

We envision an Andrews Experience that creates a campus culture that surrounds students with love and acceptance and thus creates an atmosphere in which holistic development occurs.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Each student will be loved and valued by faculty and staff and by the members of the local church he or she chooses to attend.

2.      Faculty and staff will nurture students toward greater spiritual and moral commitment and maturity as expressed in a life of dynamic Christian discipleship.

3.      Faculty and staff will experience social and spiritual well-being through the nurture of Christian community on campus.

4.      Students will live wholesome lives that are free from sexual promiscuity and substance abuse.

5.      Graduating students will be prepared and motivated to share their faith through their chosen profession.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Each student will be loved and valued by faculty and staff and by the members of the local church he or she chooses to attend.

a.      Pastors of local churches attended by Andrews students will be invited to form a Council for Church Ministry to University Students. [To be chaired by the Campus Chaplain with oversight by the Spiritual Development Committee.]

b.      Students will be encouraged to attend a local church.  Local church listings along with personal invitations from the pastors will be included in registration packets. [Person responsible: Campus chaplain.]

c.      Academic advisors (including dissertation chairs) will be encouraged to meet with their advisees at least once each semester on an informal, “interested-in-how-you-are-doing” basis. [Academic Advising will be responsible.]

d.      Academic and work departments will become, in effect, mentoring communities. [Chairs and directors.]

e.      Students will build friendships and community through a variety of small group activities such as Freshman Family Groups, service groups, prayer and Bible study groups. [Responsible persons or entities: Coordinator of Academic Advising, service learning coordinator, campus chaplains, local churches.]

2.      Faculty and staff will nurture students toward greater spiritual and moral commitment and maturity as expressed in a life of dynamic Christian discipleship.

a.      As faculty and staff are recruited, adeptness at spiritual care giving will be considered. [A responsibility of the Human Resources Director, the President, and the Vice Presidents.]

b.      General training: Faculty will be taught strategies for nurturing students spiritually. [Teaching will take place in General Faculty meetings, Fall Fellowship, new faculty orientation, and retreats.  Spiritual Development Committee will give oversight.  Responsible person:  Academic Vice President.]

c.      Specialized training: A training program will be developed to teach selected faculty and staff how to nurture students spiritually.  Its curriculum will include developmental needs of young adults; various differences such as ethnic, cultural, and generational; effective small group leadership and development of community; stages of personal change; how to lead a student to Christ; how to mentor; and how to inculcate personal and professional integrity.  Faculty completing the training program will receive recognition, and their participation will affect advancement in rank and tenure. [Center for College Faith and the Spiritual Development Committee will be responsible.]

d.      Faculty and staff will be encouraged to mentor individual students.

3.      Faculty and staff will experience social and spiritual well-being through the nurture of Christian community on campus.

a.      Selected faculty and staff will be affirmed for their contributions to student life.

b.      At least one retreat for every work unit–however defined– will be held within the next five years to provide time for prayer, praise, and play outside of the work context. [Deans, directors, etc., will be responsible.]

c.      A chaplain selected from the faculty and staff will serve each school and each vice president’s area. [The President will ask these persons to serve, and they will be included in the committee list as Council of Chaplains.]

d.      Faculty and staff will be encouraged to become part of small groups.  Where possible, existing groups will include nurture and caring of the members as part of their agendas for students.

4.      Students will live wholesome lives that are free from sexual promiscuity and substance abuse.

a.      Wellness courses in the Gen Ed curriculum will continue teaching principles of wholesome living. [General Education Director will oversee.]

b.      Peer educators will promote drug-free living and positive friendships.

c.      Early intervention and prevention programs will become more comprehensive and aggressive.

d.      Twelve-Step programs will be provided to help students with spiritual development, including emotional healing.

e.      At least one chapel or assembly program each year for both undergraduates and Seminary students will feature Christian motivational speakers on the topic of moral responsibility and behavior.  [CARL Committee.]

f.      Ways to present Christian sexual morality as the most life-affirming choice will be identified.

g.      In chapels, worships, and designated courses, students will be taught how to make appropriate entertainment choices, especially in responses to the media.

5.      Graduating students will be prepared and motivated to share their faith through their chosen professions.

a.      Faculty will teach their discipline from a Christian worldview and will help students consider their vocation as a call to service.

b.      General education courses will continue to develop a Christian worldview and to foster an understanding of Christian beliefs.

c.      Service learning will instill and/or reinforce the students’ service motivation.

d.      Students will be taught how to witness for Christ in their places of work and in the ordinary routines of life.

e.      Campus Ministries will lead out in making Andrews University a training center for discipleship.

D. Projected Outcome

At the end of five years, our campus will be known as a mentoring Christian community for students. Enough consciousness-raising, enough training, enough community building will have occurred among faculty and staff to produce a core of individuals committed to mentoring students academically, professionally, and spiritually. The time will be approaching when “every professor is a spiritual guide and every syllabus a confession of faith.” A majority of students will report experiences as part of a mentoring community where faculty and/or staff have guided them and cared about them and where they have developed enduring and supportive friendships with these mature adults and their own peers.

VI.            Faculty Development and the Academic Success Of Students

A. Definition And Vision

The academic success of students largely depends upon faculty members who are committed to student learning; who foster productive, interactive relationships with students; and who model a balanced lifestyle.  Simply put, faculty success helps support and nurture student success.  The faculty at Andrews University demonstrate their success through excellent teaching, generous service to the university and community, and dynamic professional growth and contributions to their discipline.

 

Faculty will demonstrate success in the areas of teaching, service and scholarship. In doing so they will draw students into unique and personal learning opportunities.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Faculty who demonstrate increased excellence in teaching.

2.      Faculty who provide improved service to the University and the wider community.

3.      Faculty who are growing and productive professionals in their own disciplines.

4.      Faculty who understand and employ a growing amount of technology in the classroom to improve the quality of education.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Faculty who demonstrate increased excellence in teaching.

a.      Faculty members will attend and participate in instructional development seminars. (IT)

b.      The Assessment Office will continue improving the collection, analysis and dissemination of student learning outcomes at Andrews University.  Additional areas may include:

i.      Revised instruments for the student evaluation of teaching.

ii.      Senior exit testing in major field areas.

iii.      Additional outcomes-based assessment such as post-graduation employability.

c.      Assessment of learning outcomes in individual classes.

d.      Recognition will be given to good advising as an integral part of good teaching.

e.      Faculty members will raise the level of advising from informational to developmental—taking advantage of campus resources and referrals.

f.      Advising loads will be spread equitably between members of a program or department, with release time provided for those who have excessive advising loads.

g.      Faculty members will engage in classroom research to improve pedagogy and will publish the results of such research.

h.      Faculty members will recognize and refer needful students to the Early Alert System (Student Success Consultant).

i.      Faculty members will steadfastly seek to integrate faith and learning in the classroom.

2.      Faculty who provide improved service to the university and the wider community.

a.      A support system will be implemented for faculty whose area of excellence is service, including seminars on service in committees, department and program leadership, and sponsorship of student organizations.

b.      A network throughout the university will connect personnel to service opportunities in the community and university members of community organizations.

c.      Encouragement of and recognition for service to professional societies/organizations.

3.      Faculty who are growing and productive professionals in their own disciplines.

a.      Expectations of growth in their discipline and advancement in rank will be matched by opportunities provided by the university, including:

i.      Additional financial support for attendance and presentations at professional meetings.

ii.      Funding to support a sabbatical system.

iii.     Appropriate release time for researchers.

iv.     Increased internal grant funding for research/creative activity.

v.      Intra- and inter-disciplinary research/creative activities, led by experienced faculty mentors (supported by leadership from the Office of Scholarly Research). (IT: AcadComp grants)

vi.      Promotion of professional growth, student involvement and initiatives likely to attract external funding.

b.      Each full-time faculty member, in consultation with the department chair, will determine how much of his/her time is to be spent on teaching/advising, service, research.  That division of time will be used as a basis for evaluation and promotion in rank and/or continuous employment.

4.      Faculty who understand and employ a growing amount of technology in the classroom.

a.      Inform faculty of the ways that technology can be used to help enhance student learning (e.g., brown bag lunches, demonstrations, departmental and faculty meetings). (IT)

b.      Make opportunities available for faculty to become skilled in the use of tools and techniques to improve student learning (e.g., workshops, user groups, mentoring opportunities). (IT)

c.      Establish mechanisms to provide faculty release time (e.g., reduced teaching loads, study leaves) and other incentives (e.g., promotion, rank and tenure) to learn technology.

d.      Provide faculty with appropriate qualified instructional support personnel (e.g., departmental, school and university-wide support staff). (IT)

e.      Expand and improve the availability of information technologies for faculty and students (e.g., laptops, LCD projectors, internet access in classrooms). (IT; CS)

D. Projected Outcome

Faculty will be excited about their discipline and their work at Andrews University. They will identify and document their area of excellence: teaching, research, or service. They will demonstrate effective methods of feedback and intervention that lead to student success.

VII.          Graduate Education

A. Definition And Vision

Andrews University was created from Emmanuel Missionary College to provide graduate education to meet the professional personnel needs of the church.  In the fall of 2000, 37% of the students enrolled were graduate and post-baccalaureate professional students.

 

Andrews University continues its leadership role in providing graduation education for the denomination. Its graduate alumni fill leadership positions of Adventist church organizations and institutions around the world. Thus, the quality of graduate education is a critical mission for the university.

 

Increasingly, graduate education is provided at a distance from the home campus by means of extension and field-based programs.  Such forms of graduate education are further addressed below (International Education; Distance Education).

 

Graduate students at Andrews University will study in quality degree programs that prepare them for leadership roles in the church, business, and community.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Graduate education at Andrews is positioned and marketed through faculty-directed enrollment efforts that raise graduate programs to levels of enrollment appropriate to the discipline.

2.      Graduate programs will offer research opportunities and faculty guidance that develop students in their critical thinking, analysis, and planning skills.

3.      A continuous quality improvement (CQI) system builds and maintains excellence in graduate programs, policies, and processes so that all programs are current and reputable in quality. (AS)

4.      Sufficient financial resources enable graduate students to concentrate on their studies.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Graduate education at Andrews is positioned and marketed through involvement of faculty-directed recruitment efforts so that graduate programs have stipulated levels of enrollment appropriate to the discipline.

a.      Faculty are available for and respond appropriately to inquiries about graduate programs and research opportunities at Andrews. (AS: portal; UR: web)

b.      Graduate recruitment processes are monitored and supported by a central graduate enrollment coordinator.

c.      New markets are explored for graduate degrees and continuing education through graduate certificates (e.g. urban pastors).

2.      Graduate programs will offer research opportunities and faculty guidance that develop students in their critical thinking, analysis, and planning skills.

a.      Faculty loads allow adequate time for mentoring graduate students and supervising their research projects and dissertations.

b.      Faculty are supported in the development and funding of a research agenda that attracts and supports graduate students in learning scholarly processes.

c.      Internal grant support is expanded to encourage junior faculty in building scholarship activities. (IT: AcadComp grants)

d.      Faculty development seminars enhance faculty networks, research collaboration, and skills in obtaining external funding for research.

e.      Faculty sabbaticals and release time are available to support scholarly and creative activities.

f.      Endowed chairs are funded that provide additional resources for research.

g.      Increased partnerships with community agencies and corporations exist to provide opportunities for basic and applied research.

3.      A continuous quality improvement (CQI) system builds and maintains excellence in graduate programs, policies, and processes so that all programs are current and reputable in quality.

a.      Program review occurs through guidelines and monitoring of the Graduate Council (developed in collaboration with the Undergraduate Council).

b.      Graduate programs convey an intentional SDA Christian philosophy appropriate to the discipline.

c.      The Graduate Council and School of Graduate Studies maintain institutional quality through standards and CQI processes that are understood and utilized in all academic and professional programs.

4.      Sufficient financial resources enable graduate students to concentrate of their studies.

a.      There are increased graduate assistantships via an enlarged endowment and greater flow of indirect funds from external grants.

b.      Graduate programs and the research achievements of the university have increased visibility and support through University Relations and Advancement presentations to prospective donors.

D. Projected Outcome

Church and community leaders will express recognition of the quality of Andrews University graduate programs. High caliber students will select Andrews University for graduate education. Quality improvement mechanisms will maintain current and sustainable programs.

VIII.       International Education Leadership

A. Definition And Vision

For more than two decades, Andrews University has facilitated learning by students in global classrooms through institutional affiliation, extension degrees, and, more recently, a field-based delivery system.  Thus Andrews has not only attracted many international students to its campus, but has also nurtured the development of other institutions, provided leadership resources for the church, and fostered the world church’s awareness of the essentials of higher education.

 

With the projected increase in church membership during the next decade, Andrews anticipates increasing its delivery of educational opportunities, particularly graduate degrees, to the world field in global classrooms distant from the home campus.

 

Andrews University educates and mentors the leadership personnel of the world Seventh-day Adventist church and its educational institutions.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Provide leadership preparation through graduate education internationally using field-based and extension models.

2.      Consult with and mentor educational institutions in the provision of reputable, good-quality Christian education.

3.      Expand the role of pacesetter among Adventist educational institutions in educating the church on the meaning and essential qualities of a higher education, especially the role of a university.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Provide leadership preparation through graduate education internationally using field-based and extension models.

a.      Develop church administrative and pastoral leadership in collaboration with the world divisions by providing masters and doctoral degrees in various geographic regions.

b.      Prepare professionals in international development, business, and institutional management through graduate certificates and masters’ degrees.

c.      Seek financial resources to support expansion of leadership capacity by international education.

2.      Consult with and mentor educational institutions in the provision of reputable, good-quality Christian education.

a.      Welcome postdoctoral fellows and visiting faculty for short-term research fellowships and project participation.

b.      Provide internships in administration to guest administrators from other Adventist institutions.

c.      Continue the provision of library development advice and services to Adventist educational institutions outside NAD.

d.      Build networks of faculty on-campus with colleagues on affiliated and extension site campuses through teacher exchanges and greater inclusion of campus faculty on audit teams visiting those institutions.

e.      Maintain a rigorous monitoring system assuring consistency and credibility in international admissions, curriculum approval, and faculty selection via the Affiliations and Extension Programs Committee.

3.      Expand the role of pacesetter among Adventist educational institutions in educating the church on the meaning and essential qualities of a higher education, especially the role of a university.

a.      Develop administrative seminars, consultations, and articulation agreements with educational institutions in developing countries.

b.      Be available to participate in a greater way in the development of the General Conference accreditation body and its work.

c.      Serve as a host to international education conferences in cooperation with the General Conference Department of Education.

D. Projected Outcome

Andrews University will continue to be recognized as the flagship institution for the development of the leadership personnel of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.  Venues will increase for graduate degrees through Andrews in geographical territories outside North America and increased collaborative arrangements with other Adventist educational institutions in these regions.

IX.            Distance Education and the Off-Campus Student

A. Definition And Vision

This section of the Strategic Plan focuses on education delivered to students away from the home-campus whose instruction involves electronic technologies either synchronous or asynchronous.  Not considered are students enrolled in studies on affiliated campuses or extension sites except as these may be served through electronic means.

 

For the traditional student, campus learning is considered the optimal modality.  The use of electronic technologies designed for distance education may also benefit such on-campus students (e.g. by distributed education).

 

Access to an Adventist Christian education will be provided to Adventist and non-Adventist learners unable to attend Andrews University in person.

 

Although many of these learners will be adults seeking to complete a baccalaureate degree, Andrews University will also offer on-line education at the graduate level. Degree programs provided by on-site graduate faculty will be augmented with electronic resources, communications, and library databases.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Grow courses available on-line in both quantity and quality in all schools of the university.

2.      Develop faculty competence in instructional design and delivery, technology use, and appropriate pedagogical methods. (IT)

3.      Assure adequate infrastructure to support services to off-campus students. (SN)

4.      Collaborate with other SDA institutions in providing degree programs that could not be supported solely by Andrews University.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Grow courses available on-line in both quantity and quality in all schools of the university.

a.      Establish school-level Distributed Education Committees to plan and advocate--within school faculties and curriculum committees--an increase in courses taught on-line.

b.      Develop rank and tenure criteria that recognize course authorship and teaching by electronic means.

c.      Make a market study to determine needs for on-line courses. (IR)

d.      Market on-line courses to alumni, to persons who began but did not complete AU studies, and to other appropriate segments.

2.      Develop faculty competence in instructional design and delivery, technology use, and related pedagogical methods. (IT)

a.      Provide opportunities and resources for faculty release time.

b.      Develop faculty user-groups in which experienced faculty advise novice faculty.  The faculty advisors would have primary access to technical support staff for problem-solving.

c.      Identify, as demand increases, school-based faculty mentors to receive course release time in order to assist other faculty with course development.

d.      Develop a series of pedagogical workshops on the use of on-line technology for learning. (IT)

e.      Develop and maintain appropriate professional support staff trained in current technology. (IT)

3.      Assure adequate infrastructure to support services to off-campus students. (SN; TC)

a.      Provide appropriate on-line support such as financial aid, registration, advising, and career guidance services.(AS)

b.      Maintain and expand, as demand requires, communications technology infrastructure. (SN; TC)

c.      Plan the deployment of upgrades to services to keep pace with demand.  Areas to monitor include:

i.      Bandwidth of the Internet connection. (SN)

ii.      Capacity of key servers, such as firewalls, filters, caches, web, email and calendar, file and print, administrative functions, home directories, etc. (SN)

iii.      Condition and location of cables and network closets. (SN)

d.      As the number of services grows, and dependence on those services increases, provide the resources necessary to ensure adequate and reliable performance. (SN)

e.      Maintain appropriate documentation and follow accepted backup procedures to ensure minimum disruption in the event of system failures. (SN; AS)

f.      Develop increased technological infrastructure for conferencing and chat services. (SN; TC)

g.      Provide additional on-line library services such as electronic reserve capacity and maintain databases for library research needs.

h.      Implement a four-year plan for upgrading classrooms as recommended by PlanET Subcommittee. (IT)

i.      Develop a school-level incentive program to reward departments and faculty who have developed on-line courses and have begun augmenting courses with on-line resources.

4.      Collaborate with other SDA institutions in providing degree programs that could not be supported solely by Andrews University.

a.      Serve on the Adventist Distance Education Consortium Board through an institutional representative and participation on subcommittees.

b.      Encourage departmental participation in developing courses that involve  collaboration with other consortium members through the use of faculty and departmental incentives (e.g. travel grants).

c.      Provide travel support for novice faculty to attend Adventist Virtual Learning Laboratory (AVLL) and similar distance education training opportunities.

D. Projected Outcome

At least 500 students will be enrolled in courses using distance education modalities. Faculty teaching such courses will be adept at providing high quality instructional design and in relating to such students as evidenced by course evaluations and anecdotal evidence.

X.             Providing An Academic Learning Community For Undergraduates

A. Definition And Vision

The optimal learning environment for an 18-24 year old undergraduate student is a campus where face-to-face relationships with faculty and other mentors assist in a positive transition from adolescence to adulthood.  To bring students to an on-campus experience, the environment must provide an attractive and supportive setting.

 

The General Education curriculum is the learning experience that prepares the undergraduate student for life in a rapidly changing world.  As a companion “pillar” to career preparation found in each undergraduate degree, it develops the student into an adult who is notable for culture, character, civility, and intellect. 

 

Because the College of Arts and Sciences houses nearly all of the General Education curriculum, it is the primary site for this learning experience.  Made up of many disciplines in several scattered buildings, however, the college has no easily recognized home.  Its size and dispersed venues convey the sense that every student is on his or her own.  Times and places for personal interaction and community are scarce yet, in a high tech age, increasingly needed.  

 

Presently, Nethery Hall is the nearest approach to an undergraduate center on campus.   Students routinely gather in its poorly lit lobby to sit and talk and occasionally study.

 

An improved undergraduate academic environment will be established by the construction of Buller Hall and renovation of Nethery Hall. These capital improvements will provide a place where various students experience most of their General Education coursework and meet informally to network and exchange ideas.

 

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      Provide a location on-campus where undergraduates feel a greater sense of belonging and student identity as they move into adulthood.

2.      Update the spaces used for larger undergraduate classes to accommodate twenty-first century technology.

3.      Develop an appropriate faculty-based process for making the plans for these spaces.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Provide a location on-campus where undergraduates feel a greater sense of belonging and student identity as they move into adulthood.

a.      Situate departments offering freshman and sophomore General Education courses in Buller and Nethery Halls.

b.      Encourage academic conversations by creating a number of spaces for small- group interaction between students and students; students and faculty; and faculty and faculty.

c.      Incorporate a small chapel in Buller Hall that provides a quiet place of beauty for meditation in the midst of the undergraduate center.

d.      Locate the Center for College Faith in the undergraduate center to emphasize the centrality of spiritual development in the undergraduate experience.

e.      Upgrade building functions and attractiveness in Nethery Hall to maintain this architectural gem as a traditional site of Andrews University.

f.      Provide attractive and comfortable office settings for faculty work.

g.     Create a faculty center for collegial and social interaction.

2.      Update the spaces used for larger undergraduate classes to accommodate twenty-first century technology.

a.      Incorporate the latest classroom technology into all rooms used for larger classes. (IT; SN)

b.      Build a teaching auditorium with appropriate technological equipment for large-group instruction and dramatic productions. (IT; SN)

3.      Develop an appropriate faculty-based process for making the plans for these spaces.

a.      Continue representation of the relevant departments on the Liberal Arts Complex Steering Committee.

b.      Assure, through review of space utilization, that adequate classroom space is provided for an increased undergraduate enrollment over the next ten years.

D. Projected Outcome

Undergraduate students will experience the small-college “feel” that results from a greater sense of place, belonging, and identity with Andrews University.  The effectiveness of the General Education curriculum will be enhanced by many out-of-class academic and personal conversations among students and faculty.

XI.            Financial Resources and Student Financial Support

A. Definition And Vision

The financial resources of the university provide an essential component of support for achieving the university’s mission of “educating its students for generous service.”   There are two major types of financial resources: resources for students and organizational resources that pay for the capital and operational expenses.

 

The institution will move to “the next level” in financial resources by providing additional aid for students (utilizing an optimum process), appropriate levels of operational support and liquidity to meet the institution’s mission.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      In consultation with Enrollment Services and Academic Administration, develop a financial and academic profile of the students, undergraduate and graduate, that the university wishes to enroll and implement the financial component of the plan by providing appropriate financial support. (IR)

2.      Optimize the net revenue from students by use of the Noel Levitz financial aid leveraging model providing appropriate support for students and maximizing enrollment.

3.      Improve the university’s working capital to 65% of the level recommended in church policy, improve the institution’s “Education and General” [E & G] bottom line to the mean for similar institutions or 3% (whichever is greater), and increase funding for “Operation and Maintenance” of Plant [O & M] to national norms for colleges and universities on a square foot basis.

4.      Increase or reallocate E & G resources to provide increased capital renewal and replacement resources (SN) to a level equal to or greater than depreciation; and require that auxiliary profits plus depreciation be used for auxiliary activities in the current or future years.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      Enrollment and Student Financial Support

a.      Develop a strategic, targeted enrollment plan identifying the academic profile of students that the university wishes to enroll, such plan to be developed and approved by December 2001. (IR)

b.      Complete the development of the financial aid website that enables students to use a search feature to select and evaluate institutional financial aid, development of this web-base site is to be completed by December 2001. (AS)

c.      Develop a process for evaluating and awarding “desired graduate students” with appropriate scholarships, tuition and teaching fellowships during the 2001-02 school year. (AS)

d.      Develop a plan and appraise students of a plan whereby they can graduate with minimum debt.

2.      Optimizing Net Tuition Revenue and Enrollment.

a.      Begin the financial aid leveraging model and awarding process for school year 2001-02 in consultation with academic leadership and Noel Levitz. (AS)

b.      Fully implement for the 2002-03 school year the Noel Levitz recommended financial aid leveraging plan for undergraduate students. (AS)

c.      During the Noel Levitz consulting process, develop an international student financial aid leveraging analysis by May 2002.

3.      Improve the university’s working capital to 65% of the level recommended in church policy, improve the institution’s “Education & General” [E & G] bottom line to the mean for similar institutions or 3% (whichever is greater), and increase funding for “Operation & Maintenance” of Plant [O & M] to national norms for colleges and universities on a square-foot basis.

a.      Recommend that the university limit internal borrowing to capital projects of two years or less and require that existing borrowing in excess of two years be set up on a five-year amortization schedule.

b.      Increase the budgeted bottom-line by $250,000 per year until achieving a 3% budgeted surplus.

c.      Increase the funding levels for O & M from the present level to the regional norms for colleges and universities (on a square foot basis) in inflation-adjusted proportional increments over the five-year period.  In addition, increase the O & M funding for new space that is brought into service by an amount equivalent to the regional norm for O & M. (SN)

d.      Implement a strategy for creating a nimble and market-sensitive program review process that takes account of faculty determined criteria, reduces institutional operating expenses, and makes more efficient the delivery of educational services by academic programs having marginal rates of productivity, viability and sustainability. (AS)

e.      In consultation with the General Conference officers, develop and propose a formula for operating support that is indexed to the North American Division tithe, such implementation to be completed by calendar year budget 2003.

f.      In consultation with the North American Division officers, develop a philosophy and formula for operational support of the seminary professional programs, such formula to be indexed to North American Division tithe.  (It should be noted that NAD, the home division of the graduate and seminary programs, does not contribute to the operational support of the university).

g.      Implement a strategy for making the delivery of support expenses more efficient and effective. (CS)

h.      Implement or continue a strategy that expects each ancillary activity to operate with a surplus and return a minimum of 5% of gross revenues to the university for the support of indirect expenses.

4.      Capital Renewal and Replacement. (SN)

a.      Reduce E & G dependence on auxiliary operating surpluses by $50,000 year until 100% of the auxiliary operating surpluses and depreciation are retained by the auxiliaries.

b.      Plan and budget for auxiliary profits and depreciation to be used for auxiliary facility and equipment renewal and replacement in current or future years, and develop a long-range plan by 2002-03 for auxiliary facility improvement, renovation and/or replacement.

c.      Develop a coherent plan for the renewal of academic facility space and develop an appropriate level of support for equipment replacement (including IT). (SN)

D. Projected Outcome

Andrews University “educates its students for generous service.”  As a result of providing additional financial resources for students and optimizing that process for both the student and the institution’s benefit, and as a result of aligning general institution resources for the support of operations, capital, and facilities, the university will be strengthened with increased enrollment and stronger financial reserves to optimize academic opportunities for the future.

 

As institutions of higher education compete for students, faculty, and scarce financial resources, Andrews will have grown its enrollment and better positioned itself financially to serve the need of students and its church constituent entities.

XII.         The Public Profile Of Andrews University

A. Definition And Vision

University Advancement at Andrews University supports and promotes the mission of Andrews University and the vision and plans of its leaders, and seeks to implement effective, sound programs in fund-raising, public affairs, communications, alumni affairs and other externally focused programs.

 

Advancing Andrews University to its many public constituencies requires close coordination among interrelated units and services. Like links in a chain, each unit or service works together to strengthen the effectiveness of University Advancement, which encompasses alumni, development, planned giving and public relations.

 

Major themes and messages of Andrews University will be communicated, and the support of friends and alumni will increase.

B. Goals For The Ensuing Five Years

1.      To make friends for Andrews University.

2.      To raise funds in support of Adventist Christian education at Andrews University.

3.      To create an image that advances the cause of Adventist Christian education at Andrews University.

C. Action Steps Towards The Goals

1.      As regards the raising of money

a.      Obtain donations over the internet/secure server. (AS; SN)

b.      Segment donors as appropriate.

c.      Improve Banner technology usage. (AS)

d.      Improve income-producing performance of Advancement departments.

e.      Educate students toward voluntary support.

f.       Plan for the next Capital Campaign.

g.      Assess the current Capital Campaign.

h.      Develop a plan to increase endowment monies to $100 million.

2.      As regards the making of friends.

a.      Provide programming to tell the centennial story.

b.      Improve and enhance opportunities for volunteerism within the university (e.g. using Trustees and members of the President’s Circle).

c.      Make presentations at AU Employee/Faculty/Seminary/Freshman orientation activities.

d.      Encourage campus involvement with the community.

e.      Invite the community to become involved in welcoming Andrews University students to Berrien.

3.      As regards the image of Andrews University.

a.      Improve imaging of the campus to constituencies, including presentations at area service clubs and increased news coverage by WAUS, regional newspapers, and the Andrews University home page. (AS)

b.      Develop an administrative framework on university marketing and imaging.

c.      Improve the understanding of advancement concepts by the campus, thereby allowing for more effective communication with potential donors and friends.

 

It is understood that the financial resources needed to accomplish these strategic goals must be targeted toward:

1.      Improving the technological capabilities of Advancement offices.

2.      Enhancing the human resources development opportunities of the Division.

3.      Facilitating a worldwide imaging campaign to increase the visibility of Andrews.

4.      Assessing the attitudes and financial abilities of the friends and donors of Andrews.

5.      Targeting program dollars to enhance opportunities for making and renewing relationships with alumni and friends.

D. Projected Outcome

Implementation of the above goals will have the following results:

1.      A 10% increase annually in external support income over a five-year period.

2.      University Advancement serving as a model advancement program for other Seventh-day Adventist universities and colleges.

3.      Recognition of Andrews University as a respected and well-supported institution by its alumni.

4.      Completion of Capital Campaign activities: Seminary Hall--2001, Performing Arts Center--2003, new entry to the university--2003, Buller Hall--2004, Nethery Hall--2005.

5.      Strengthened and expanded relationships between Andrews University and Southwestern Michigan through.

a.      The events of the centennial celebration of Andrews University’s move to Berrien Springs.

b.      The construction of a new campus entrance to increase the accessibility and visibility of the campus to our local community.

c.      The provision of quality music in the new Performance Center for the campus and the community.

6.      Increased volunteerism by alumni, students and friends to enhance and facilitate organizational programming.