In the November 1, 1996 issue of CIO, there is a special report on the CIO Career.

 

CIO November 1, 1996, p48

Survival of the Fittest

Try facing down hostile, technologically savvy users and unsupportive bosses.  Or coping with outrageous expectations, alien cultures and the crushing pace of business and technology change. Compound those threats with the personal demon of many IS executives—communication deficit disorder—and you have the most dangerous executive position this side of the CEO.

 

 

CIO November 1, 1996, p52

Hazards Map

Potential dangers for the CIO position

·         Absent or hostile relationships

·         Unrealistic expectations

·         Culture clashes

·         Little involvement in strategic planning

·         An IS plan that’s not integrated with the business strategy

·         Massive, enterprise-wide projects

·         Outsourcing

·         Mergers and acquisitions

·         Restructuring/decentralization

This adds some indirect clarification to the definition of CIO with its references to planning.  It also mentions some things to avoid for the CIO position to be successful.

 

CIO November 1, 1996, p56

Fitness Training

Techniques to promote CIO success and longevity

·         Adapt style to the culture

·         Cultivate a mentor

·         Build relationships

·         Communicate effectively at all levels

·         Educate peers about the CIO role

·         Check expectations along the way

·         Honor commitments

·         Be a business person first, a technologist second

·         Make sure the position is viewed as a true strategic business partner

·         Keep up with technology and management trends

·         Create technology steering committees to generate buy-in

·         Buy rather than build

·         Adapt to change

·         Be politically aware

·         Stay visible

·         Be fiscally responsible

·         Build customer-oriented staffs

 


The position of CIO is one that can (and should) have far-reaching affects on the management of information resources in an institution or enterprise.  This influence makes itself felt in two ways:

·         at the senior administrative level, by leveraging IT to empower an institution to achieve its goals,

·         at the level of the IT organization, to foster a spirit of supporting the business needs of the institution, and aligning its goals with corporate goals.

 

This is a very brief listing of attributes of a CIO that are seen as desirable in the context of the management of information resources at Andrews University.

 

1.       Participate in strategic planning at the enterprise level.

 

2.       Align IT goals and objectives with those of the university.

 

3.       Act as visionary leader [1] (this is contrasted with being a manager.)  Foster innovative research into appropriate new technologies, but ensure that proposed solutions meet real needs.

 

4.       Provide focus, direction and motivation regarding global IT issues:

·         strategic planning

·         policies and procedures

·         information management

·         client-oriented, quality support services

·         data distribution, ownership, and responsibility

·         data security and disaster recovery

·         budgeting

 

5.       Play a key role in the budgeting process, bringing together the goals and needs of the university and the available resources.

 

6.       Provide for the information technology needs of the institution through the acquisition of necessary resources and the training and development of a strong team of skilled professionals.

 

7.       Provide leadership and guidance for developing and managing the intellectual capital invested in information technologists and knowledge workers.[2]

 

8.       Foster within the IT organization a sense of understanding and support for the business processes of the university.


CIO Position Description

(source: Gartner Group Inc.)

 

Mission of the CIO:

To provide technology vision and leadership for developing and implementing IT initiatives that create and maintain leadership for the enterprise in a constantly changing and intensely competitive marketplace.

 

Reporting Relationship:

To a senior functional executive (EVP, COO, CFO) or CEO.  Is a key management position for the organization responsible for IT policy and aligning IT strategy with business strategies.  Typical title is Vice President and Chief Information Officer (CIO).  Location is company headquarters.

 

Responsibilities:

·         Business technology planning process · sponsor collaborative planning processes

·         Applications development · new and existing for enterprise initiatives and overall coordination for SBU/divisional initiatives

·         IT infrastructure and architecture (e.g., computers and networks) · running as well as ensuring ongoing investments are made

·         Sourcing · make vs. buy decisions relative to outsourcing vs. in-house provisioning of IT services and skills

·         Partnerships · establishing strategic relationships with key IT suppliers and consultants

·         Technology transfer · provide enabling technologies that make it easier for customers and suppliers to do business with our enterprise as well as increase revenue and profitability

·         Customer satisfaction · interact with internal and external clients to ensure continuous customer satisfaction

·         Training · provide training for all IT users to ensure productive use of existing and new systems.

 

Skills Needed:

·         Strong business orientation (broad experience in our industry sector managing IT or related activities a plus (i.e., consulting or vendor in our industry)

·         Demonstrated ability to bring the benefits of IT to solve business issues while also managing costs and risk

·         Skilled at identifying and evaluating new technological developments and gauging their appropriateness for the business

·         Ability to communicate with and understand the needs of non-technical internal clients

·         Strong organizational skills and manage central IS resource and applications as well as coordinate SBU/divisional resources and initiatives

·         Ability to conceptualize, launch and deliver multiple IT projects on time and within budget.

·         Ability to mesh well with the existing management team by being a good listener, a team builder and an articulate advocate of their IT vision.

 

Personal Qualities:

Superb leadership, communication and interpersonal skills; an ability to function in a collaborative and collegial environment; sensitivity to others; high integrity and intelligence; excellent judgment; a conceptual thinker; strategic as well as pragmatic; and an ability to generate trust and build alliances with co-workers.

 

CIO Magazine
© 1997 CIO Communications, Inc.


Georgetown University – Task Force to develop a new model uniting Academic Computing Services and Information Systems under a single CIO.

 

http://www.georgetown.edu/technology/taskforce/home.htm

 

President’s charge is to provide a model for IS that will best support the computing and information technology needs of university students, faculty and administration.

 

“The consolidated unit will be headed by a Chief Information Officer, who reports as high in the Georgetown structure as possible.”

 

Requirements of the new structure:

·         provide unified oversight and leadership

·         set up an advisory structure representing needs and interests of all stakeholders

·         recommend level of capital and operating budget

·         recommend standards for hardware, software, networking, user support

·         result from a process of university-wide involvement

 

Information technology cuts across every academic discipline and administrative unit.  Today’s networked, distributed information environment thus demands a different kind of support organization.

 

Goals should be guided by common working assumptions for ubiquitous, interoperable, distributed computing:

1.       Ubiquity

2.       Interoperability

3.       The Distributed System

4.       System Transparency

5.       End-User “Frontline” Support

 

Team 1:  Organizational Structure – Functions & CIO Job Descritpion

4. Review and compare IT organizational models

5. Draft recommended job description for CIO

 

Team 2:  Budget, Resource Allocation & Funding

4. alternative models of paying for IT services (charge-back, etc)

 

Team 3:  Front Line Support for Students, Faculty and Staff

 

Team 4:  Standards and Networking

 

Team 5:  Human Resources

2. Issues in hiring, training, evaluating, retaining IT staff

 

Team 6:  Communications

 

Executive Summary

 

Team 1

Form the UIS (our ITS) Advisory Committee to advise the CIO.  This advisory group is representative of the entire University and is designed to advise and guide the CIO and Executive Sponsors.

 

Rationale:  Fostering an administrative structure with a more global and long-range planning perspective, greater accountability, and increased communication.

 

Useful web links at: http://www.georgetown.edu/technology/taskforce/resources.htm

 

Andrews University logo

Job Title:                   Chief Information Officer (CIO)

Department:             Information Technology Services (ITS) - Administration

Reports To:              President

FLSA Status:           

 

Prepared By:            David Heise

Prepared Date:        03-Sep-98

Approved By:           

Approved Date:       

Summary

Provides technology vision and leadership for developing and implementing IT initiatives that create and maintain leadership for the University in a constantly changing and intensely competitive marketplace.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include the following. Other duties may be assigned.

1.       Directs information management budgeting, strategic and tactical planning, business process re-engineering, and database system strategy.

Percentage of time spent on task:  15%

 

2.       Oversees planning and implementation of all administrative information systems.

Percentage of time spent on task:  15%

 

3.       Explores new technologies for future planning and potential implementation.

Percentage of time spent on task:  12%

 

4.       Directs the information strategy of the university by sponsoring collaborative planning processes.

Percentage of time spent on task:  10%

 

5.       Identifies user needs and directs building of MIS teams to work across all levels of the organization.

Percentage of time spent on task:  10%

 

6.       Interfaces with industry on information management and information technology matters, establishing strategic relationships with key IT suppliers and consultants.

Percentage of time spent on task:  10%

 

7.       Sets overall directions for planning and administering the IT infrastructure and architecture, ensuring that ongoing investments are made.

Percentage of time spent on task:   7%

 

8.       Provides training for all IT users to ensure productive use of existing and new systems.

Percentage of time spent on task:   7%

 

9.       Provides enabling technologies that make it easier for customers (both internal and external) and suppliers to do business with the University as well as increase revenue and profitability.

Percentage of time spent on task:   5%

 

10.   Makes decisions to build or buy in relation to outsourcing vs. in-house provisioning of IT services and skills.

Percentage of time spent on task:   5%

 

11.   Serves as primary corporate spokesperson for information management.

Percentage of time spent on task:   4%

 

Supervisory Responsibilities

Manages six subordinate supervisors who supervise a total of 20 employees in the Client Services, Instructional Technology, Networks & Servers, Administrative Systems, Telecommunications, and Institutional Research.  Is responsible for the overall direction, coordination, and evaluation of these units.  Also directly supervises one non-supervisory employee.  Carries out supervisory responsibilities in accordance with the organization's policies and applicable laws. Responsibilities include interviewing, hiring, and training employees; planning, assigning, and directing work; appraising performance; rewarding and disciplining employees; addressing complaints and resolving problems.

 

Qualifications 

To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability required. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.

 

Skills Needed

·         Strong business orientation, with broad experience in higher education managing IT

·         Demonstrated ability to bring the benefits of IT to solve business issues while also managing costs and risk

·         Skilled at identifying and evaluating new technological developments and gauging their appropriateness for the business

·         Ability to communicate with and understand the needs of non-technical internal clients

·         Strong organizational and management skills as well as the ability to lead by projecting a vision of a new future

·         Ability to conceptualize, launch and deliver multiple IT projects on time and within budget

·         Ability to mesh well with the existing management team by being a good listener, a team builder and an articulate advocate of their IT vision.

 

Personal Qualities

Superb leadership, communication and interpersonal skills; an ability to function in a collaborative and collegial environment; sensitivity to others; high integrity and intelligence; excellent judgment; a conceptual thinker; strategic as well as pragmatic; and an ability to generate trust and build alliances with co-workers.

 

Education and/or Experience

Master's degree in computing (M. Comp.) or equivalent, and four to ten years related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience.

 

Language Skills

Ability to read, analyze, and interpret common technical journals, financial reports, and legal documents.  Ability to respond to common inquiries or complaints from clients, regulatory agencies, or members of the business community. Ability to effectively present information to top management, public groups, and/or boards of directors.

 

Reasoning Ability

Ability to define problems, collect data, establish facts, and draw valid conclusions. Ability to interpret an extensive variety of technical instructions in mathematical or diagram form and deal with several abstract and concrete variables.


Chief Information Officer

Position Purpose

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) is accountable for directing the information and data integrity of the enterprise and its groups and for all Information Service functions of the enterprise, including all data centers, technical service centers, production scheduling functions, help desks, communication networks (voice and data), computer program development and computer systems operations. He or she is responsible for maintaining the integrity of all electronic and optical books and records of the enterprise including review of computerized and manual systems; information processing equipment and software for acquisition, storage and retrieval; and definition of the strategic direction of all information processing and communication systems and operations. He or she provides overall management and definition of all computer and communication activities within the enterprise including responsibility for providing a leadership role in the day to day operations of the Information Services functions as well as providing direction as the enterprise grows through internal growth ad external acquisition.

 

Problems and Challenges

The major challenge for this individual is managing the information technology affairs of the enterprise while balancing technological and operational needs with financial and marketing needs. This is to be accomplished with the use of computer and communication technology that supports both self generated growth and growth through acquisition. Seamless integration of data and information from the customer through financial statement and management reporting is one of the primary challenges of this position.

This position requires time management skills in directing as variety of projects in addition to an understanding of the ways in which information technology can be applied within the enterprise. The position required supervisory/management experience and the flexibility to deal with people at a variety of levels, both internally and externally.


The above information is from Positive Support Review Inc.'s Information Systems Position Descriptions HandiGuide . This book describes more than 140 IS positions typically found in today's IS organizations, including position purpose, problems and challenges and essential position functions and requirements. In addition to a printed and bound hard copy, the book is available in both word processing and multi-media format.

CIO Magazine
© 1996 CIO Communications, Inc.


What is a CIO?

CIOs are senior executives responsible for all aspects of their companies' information technology and systems. They direct the use of IT to support the company's goals. With knowledge of both technology and business process and a cross-functional perspective, they are usually the managers most capable of aligning the organization's technology deployment strategy with its business strategy. CIOs oversee technology purchases, implementation and various related services provided by the information systems department. However, at many leading-edge organizations, the CIO delegates many of the tactical and operational issues to a "trusted lieutenant" in order to focus on more strategic concerns.

The "information" part of the CIO's job is increasingly important. The effective and strategic use of common enterprise-wide information requires someone with a cross-functional perspective. CIOs have taken a leadership role in reengineering their organizations' business processes and the underpinning IT infrastructures to achieve more productive, efficient and valuable use of information within the enterprise. Many are also taking a leadership role in knowledge management and the valuation of intellectual capital. Similarly, CIOs are in an ideal position to lead organizations' Internet and Web initiatives.

CIOs usually report to the CEO, COO or CFO, and they often have a seat on the executive steering committee or board (or at least have frequent and close access to top officers). While the specific title "CIO" is generally a clear indication of an IT executive's senior rank and strategic influence, many executives with the title VP or director of information technology, systems or services hold comparable positions.

http://www.cio.com/CIO/rc_wtcio.html (now moved)



[1] “IS needs leader, not managers.  Managing is the time spent supervising people and doing the day-to-day work of the organizations; leadership is the time spent improving the way the organization operates.” N. Dean Meyer, ComputerWorld 17 June, 1996

[2] “IS managers should focus on managing and supporting three distinct but highly related areas:

Christopher Gopal and Joseph Gagnon, ComputerWorld 19 June, 1995